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Chair(s)

  • Professor Xiaozhou Liao

    Executive Editor of Microstructures
    School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Australia.

Speaker(s)

  • Professor Zhi-Gang Chen

    Senior Editorial Board Member of Microstructures
    School of Chemistry and Physics, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

    Prof. Zhi-Gang Chen is a Professor of Energy Materials at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). He received his PhD degree at the Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science in 2008. Before joining QUT, he has worked at the University of Queensland and University of Southern Queensland with various prestigious fellowships, including UQ Postdoctoral Fellowship, ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship, and QLD Smart Future Fellowship. In 2012, he won a Queensland International Fellowship to undertake collaborative research at California Institute of Technology. His expertise is concentrating in smart thermoelectrics from synthesizing materials to understanding their underlying physics and chemistry. His research has been well awarded by receiving a few competitive research grants, as well as prestigious awards/fellowships, all at national, state and university levels. In total, Dr Chen received ~A$20,000,000 (including 6 ARC Discovery and 2 ARC linkage projects) in research grants to support the research. Currently, Dr Chen is leading 3 ARC discovery projects, 2 ARC Linkage projects, and 3 industry investments. Dr Chen is one Clarivate Highly Cited Researcher (Top 0.1% researcher in the world) and has authored over 360 high-impact journal publications. These publications have attracted over 25000 Scopus citations and H index of 81.

    Contributions:
    Advances in conducting polymer-based thermoelectric materials and devices

Introduction

To reduce our dependence on fuel oil and green gas emission, the search for the high figure of merit (ZT) thermoelectric materials has been carried out extensively. Metal chalcogenides and their flexible materials, as ideal thermoelectric candidates for room temperature and intermediate temperature applications, have been considered the most important thermoelectric materials in this field and show great potential on power generation and refrigeration. However, further improving their thermoelectric performance has been a current global research focus, which needs innovative strategies. In this presentation, we summarize our recent findings on thermoelectric materials used for energy conversion generators and medical devices. Particularly, employing innovative bandgap engineering and nanostructure engineering, we develop new-type thermoelectric materials with record high thermoelectric efficiency. By using topology design and device assembly, a few thermoelectric devices have been developed to harvest electricity from industry waste heat and body heat or used for personal heat management.
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